All you have to know…

Please be free to use these items for your programs and presswork.

Members

strings…

violins: Kei Shirai, violin & Emily Körner
viola: Janis Lielbardis
violoncello: Gen Yokosaka
bass: Ryutaro Hei

guest…

violoncello: Tristan Cornut

winds…

clarinet: Dirk Altmann
bassoon: Hanno Dönneweg
horn: Wolfgang Wipfler

flute: Sébastian Jacot*
oboe: Philippe Tondre*

*special programs

Beethoven Mania
#BTHVN2020

Septet e-flat major op. 20
Symphony no. 8 op. f-major op. 91
Egmont op. 84
“An die ferne Geliebte” op. 98
“Adelaide” op. 46
Variations on a Händel theme WoO 45
Dances WoO 14/ 9 / 17

guest…

Ilker Arcayürek, tenor

Recordings

remarks…

With Kei Shirai, our Japanese-Viennese concertmaster, we have tried to make Mozart’s euphoria and sense of fun at disrupting traditional ways of making music audible in each bar, with each phrasing and articulation. In the quintet, the clarinet sweeps away the classical phrase introduced by the venerable string quartet right at the beginning with a “Haydnesque joke.” After that, it torments the first violin, makes demands of the other instruments in terms of dynamics and agility, only in the next bar to blend quite naturally with the string sound. In the concerto, the clarinet takes the place of a small opera ensemble, from lyrical soprano cantilenas, through virtuoso mezzo coloraturas, to a laughing commentary in the bass line. This is really not an end-of-life piece. We have consciously based the orchestral forces for the concerto on the string strengths passed down to us from the Prague Opera Orchestra. It seemed plausible to us that Stadler’s orchestra at the premiere could have been formed of 3 first violins, 3 second violins, 2 violas and a bass group. At that time, continuo playing was still common practice and so we added a pianoforte to the cello and bass. I would like to thank Masato Suzuki for his wonderful ideas and inspiration, which made the recording sessions a real pleasure. On a whim we decided to round off this CD with the two songs K. 523 and K. 524. I am also grateful to my colleagues in the SWR Symphony Orchestra. With them I was privileged to go through the “englightened” school of Sir Roger Norrington, and the foundations of this recording were laid in the many years of his conducting at the Radio Symphony Orchestra Stuttgart.With Kei Shirai, our Japanese-Viennese concertmaster, we have tried to make Mozart’s euphoria and sense of fun at disrupting traditional ways of making music audible in each bar, with each phrasing and articulation. In the quintet, the clarinet sweeps away the classical phrase introduced by the venerable string quartet right at the beginning with a “Haydnesque joke.” After that, it torments the first violin, makes demands of the other instruments in terms of dynamics and agility, only in the next bar to blend quite naturally with the string sound. In the concerto, the clarinet takes the place of a small opera ensemble, from lyrical soprano cantilenas, through virtuoso mezzo coloraturas, to a laughing commentary in the bass line. This is really not an end-of-life piece. We have consciously based the orchestral forces for the concerto on the string strengths passed down to us from the Prague Opera Orchestra. It seemed plausible to us that Stadler’s orchestra at the premiere could have been formed of 3 first violins, 3 second violins, 2 violas and a bass group. At that time, continuo playing was still common practice and so we added a pianoforte to the cello and bass. I would like to thank Masato Suzuki for his wonderful ideas and inspiration, which made the recording sessions a real pleasure. On a whim we decided to round off this CD with the two songs K. 523 and K. 524. I am also grateful to my colleagues in the SWR Symphony Orchestra. With them I was privileged to go through the “englightened” school of Sir Roger Norrington, and the foundations of this recording were laid in the many years of his conducting at the Radio Symphony Orchestra Stuttgart.

Mozart Works for clarinet

Sergei Prokofiev Chambermusic

release 2016
Available now on:

http://www.klassik-heute.de/elemente/KH_Logo_250x123.png

Künstlerische Qualität:
Künstlerische Qualität: 10
Klangqualität:
Klangqualität: 10
Gesamteindruck:
Gesamteindruck: 10
Rasmus van Rijn [06.06.2016]

Impressive is the high emotional content that the musicians give to each individual work. This  create a fascination that takes the listener from the first note until the end.
Dr. Uta Swora

klassik.com

A Man of Contradictions

However hard you try, it is impossible to form a clear picture of Sergei Prokofiev and the same applies to his work. The trends and styles of the various creative periods are too comple x and diver se. Furthermore, there seems to be an unbridgeable gulf between the self-confident innovator, (who, during his studies in Russia and later in avant-garde influenced Europe, wrote music to provoke the establishment) and the national composer, who (apparently) dutifully placed himself in the service of Stalinism. Whilst his biography cannot altogether solve this inconsistency, it can shed some light on it.

Prokofiev composed very little chamber music, but did so throughout his work. So these pieces – as well as the great symphonic works and solo concertos – display the inexhaustible variety of his compositional output on the one hand, and on the other, are an eloquent mirror on the different stages of the composer’s eventful life.

The Debut CD

Sold out

Impressive is the high emotional content that the musicians give to each individual work. This  create a fascination that takes the listener from the first note until the end.
Dr. Uta Swora

klassik.com

A Man of Contradictions

However hard you try, it is impossible to form a clear picture of Sergei Prokofiev and the same applies to his work. The trends and styles of the various creative periods are too comple x and diver se. Furthermore, there seems to be an unbridgeable gulf between the self-confident innovator, (who, during his studies in Russia and later in avant-garde influenced Europe, wrote music to provoke the establishment) and the national composer, who (apparently) dutifully placed himself in the service of Stalinism. Whilst his biography cannot altogether solve this inconsistency, it can shed some light on it.

Prokofiev composed very little chamber music, but did so throughout his work. So these pieces – as well as the great symphonic works and solo concertos – display the inexhaustible variety of his compositional output on the one hand, and on the other, are an eloquent mirror on the different stages of the composer’s eventful life.